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2020

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.19.59

JOB INSECURITY: ITS NEGATIVE EFFECT ON YOUR WELLBEING

 

FEATURE / L & M Consulting 

 

INTRODUCTION

A 2019 FMPA Survey showed job insecurity to be the overwhelming issue that most concerns FMPA members about their working/professional environment. Stress literature suggests that job insecurity, the perceived probability and perceived severity of losing one’s job, can be as stressful as losing your job. This is because the lack of control and anticipation of not being able to meet your social and economic needs makes it difficult to live in the present and to plan for the future. Further, job insecurity and redundancy can lead you to question what you know about yourself and the world.

2020

Screenshot 2020-03-31 13.58.52

NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE MORTALITY AMONG FORMER PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERS – SUMMARY

FEATURE / EMMA RUSSELL

 

Background to the FIELD study

Neurodegenerative disease in football is an area of research which has, until recently, been largely ignored. This is despite the concerns regarding the risk of neurodegenerative disease in football, which has been driven by the growing recognition of a specific type of neurodegenerative disease, called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Recognition of the pathology in post- mortem studies of boxers, American football players, and football (soccer) players has attracted wider attention and made headlines across the globe. CTE is thought to occur as a direct result of repetitive head injury, which occurs frequently in football, as well as in a variety of other contact sports.




2020

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WRIST INJURIES IN GOALKEEPERS

 

FEATURE / RAJ BHATIA, ADAM ESA & SAM HAINES

 

INTRODUCTION

Approximately 25% of all sports-related injuries involve the hand or wrist [1]. These incidents are on the increase, not only due to the increasing physical demands athletes face but also due to the increased activity level noticed amongst the general population [2]. Lower limb injuries predominate in Football players and therefore much of the published literature focuses on the lower limb, with data on the upper limb being sparse.

 




2020

Screenshot 2020-03-31 13.51.57

KAREN CARNEY A PIONEER FOR THE WOMEN’S GAME

FEATURE / SEAN CARMODY

 

On a rain-soaked afternoon in October 2008, Karen Carney collected her kit and took herself down to the park near her family’s home in Birmingham. Fallen leaves crunched against the ball as she glided between the invisible opposition, occasionally needing to play beyond dogs who had strayed from their owners’ leashes.




2020

Screenshot 2020-03-31 13.49.27

TRAINING THE SEMI-PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLER

 

FEATURE / DANIEL BERNARDIN & DYLAN MERNAGH

 

Outside of elite football, players feel that “nobody cares about them” and there is “a lack of professional support”. They “want to play at the highest level they can” and to do this, they “want to train like a pro”.

FSCR (Football Strength Conditioning & Rehabilitation) is a dedicated team of practitioners working within professional football. Our story started when a player who was at a professional academy as an 18-year old dropped down into non-league and wanted to find a way to continue to train like a professional. Our research found limited options except for expensive personal trainers with no elite football experience. This is when we realised that the semi-professional footballer was getting limited or poor support to help them be the best they can be, and FSCR was established to fulfil this need.

 




2020

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WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT? THE TRICKY QUESTION OF SPECIALISATION IN YOUTH FOOTBALL

FEATURE / LAURA FINNEGAN

 

What is specialisation?

Consensus at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) was that early sports specialization, or early single-sport specialization, be defined by the following 3 criteria: (1) Participation in intensive training and/or competition in organized sports greater than 8 months per year (essentially year round) (2) Participation in one sport to the exclusion of participation in other sports (limited free play overall) (3) Involving prepubertal (seventh grade, US, Year 8-England, S1- Scotland or roughly age 12 years) children (LaPrade et al., 2016).




2020

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UNDERSTANDING AND DEVELOPING RELATIONSHIPS IN THE MODERN FOOTBALL HIERARCHY

 

FEATURE / DR DANIEL PARNELL & PROFESSOR BARRY DRUST 

 

Over the past two decades, football has developed into a hyper-commercialised multimillion- pound industry involving a range of stakeholders including investors, global media, sponsors and supporters. One strategy aimed at creating more sustainable football operations, embraced in European football but received more reluctantly in English football, is the recruitment of a Sporting Director. Sporting Directors in football are strategically adopted to broadly protect an owner’s investment and provide a competitive advantage. Undoubtedly, there have been both early successes and failures associated with the position in the sport, yet for many in the game we are now beyond the time when the role is simply a transient trend. As a result we can expect to see Sporting Directors become more popular and mainstream across the game in the United Kingdom over the next few years.

 




2020

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GENERALISED JOINT HYPERMOBILITY WHY SHOULD IT BE SCREENED FOR WITHIN A FOOTBALL SETTING?

FEATURE / ADAM JOHNSON

 

What is Generalised Joint Hypermobility?

Generalised Joint Hypermobility is a term that is used to describe the capability of joints to move beyond their normal limits. Patients who are deemed “hypermobile” are the ones who have excessive levels of joint mobility.




2020

Screenshot 2020-03-31 13.32.00

CAUTIOUS RETURN TO PLAY COULD PREVENT MUSCLE INJURIES IN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL

 

FEATURE / HÅKAN BENGTSSON, JAN EKSTRAND, MARKUS WALDÉN, MARTIN HÄGGLUND

 

 

Muscle injuries are commonly accepted as one of the biggest challenges in football medicine being the most frequent injury type in the sport. Since 2001, the injury landscape in professional European football has been studied in the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Elite Club Injury Study (ECIS). Through ECIS, information about more than 17 000 injuries has been collected and almost 40% of these injuries have been muscle injuries.1 Over this period of time, at least between 2001 and 2014, the hamstring muscle injury burden has increased with 4% per season.2 Since the intensity of professional football also have increased it has been argued that the increase in muscle injury rate could be a response to the increased load that players are exposed to due to the increasing intensity of the game.




2020

injuries in football pic

INJURIES IN FOOTBALL: IT’S TIME TO STOP CHASING THE TRAINING LOAD UNICORN

FEATURE / FRANCO M. IMPELLIZZERI, AARON J. COUTTS, MAURIZIO FANCHINI, ALAN MCCALL

 

Training on the edge

To reach or maintain top levels of human performance sometimes we need to “train at or near the limits of human capacity”. Athletes and coaches might deliberately accept an increased injury risk as a trade-off for the performance benefits. In contrast, this is often seen very differently by upper management, supporters and media. On one side they want the best performance, on the other side they do not want to accept the risks inherent to the process leading to such a performance. Indeed, they can be very quick to point fingers when an injury occurs. This has raised the pressure and stress on support staff within football teams. We are not saying that this absconds staff of any responsibility, but these responsibilities have been exaggerated by the idea that there are effective ways (including tools) to control negative effects of pushing performance limits i.e. injury. In the past few years this has been fuelled by part of the scientific community (in good or in bad faith).




2020

injury mitigation part 2

INJURY MITIGATION IN TEAM SPORTS. PART-2: THE RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACH

 

FEATURE / Colin W. Fuller

 

Introduction

Part-1 of this series1 reviewed models used for developing sports injury mitigation programmes. Three major weaknesses were identified in the ubiquitous sequence of prevention (SoP); namely, the model focussed on reducing numbers of injury rather than injury burden, ignored associated injury management issues, and has not been operated in real-world situations. It is surprising, therefore, that SoP has provided the focus for sports injury mitigation research when there is an alternative, proven model available. Risk management has been embedded within UK health and safety legislation since publication of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. Section 2 (General duties) of this Act states “It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all his employees.”

 




2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.19.59

GETTING BACK IN THE DRIVING SEAT: TAKING CONTROL OF YOUR WORK LIFE AND WELLBEING

WELLBEING / L & M CONSULTING

In the high-pressure, often uncertain, and frequently changing world of football (and indeed, life), the above can become the norm as our options appear depleted and our decisions are influenced by external motives, pressures or social coercion. Making such externally- motivated decisions often have benefits. They might enable us to get the job done faster and within budget. We might gain rewards or reduce threats, e.g., by helping us fit in or keep favour with the boss. It might enable us to avoid negative feelings of guilt, anxiety, or protect ours (or others) egos. But despite externally- motivated actions appearing to be the best option available, they all have the potential, particularly if they dominate over time, to reduce our autonomy and wellbeing.




2019

MANAGING MENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCIES

MANAGING MENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCIES IN ELITE FOOTBALL

 

FEATURE / TIM ROGERS

 

 

Emergency is not a word or situation that many in football would necessarily associate with mental ill health However, psychiatric symptoms can cause a range of situations in which a player or coach is in a situation of imminent risk. This may be through behaviour caused by intense personal distress or suicidal intention, through self-neglect or even situations in which others are at risk. Mental ill health can cause physical health emergencies too; for example through extreme changes in eating or drinking (including in the context of eating disorder). These situations can all constitute emergencies where immediate intervention is required.




2019

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MENTAL HEALTH OF THE ELITE YOUNG ATHLETE 

FEATURE / MANROY SAHNI & JOHNSON POK-HIM TAM

Elite sport demands results. For each new generation of athletes, the bar is set higher. They strive to run further and to jump higher to surpass the achievements of their heroes. Elite sport is competitive. Young athletes at the pinnacle of their development groups are exposed to training regimes, specialised coaching and organised competition from ever earlier ages. Athletes from as young as under-13 age groups may be thrust into National and International competition1. These competitions often serve as “shop windows” for scouts and coaches to identify future stars, further piling pressure upon young athletes2. Evidently, young athletes can quickly find themselves within a cauldron of pressure and expectation. How does this impact upon their mental health and what can be done to help?




2019

SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND GAMBLING PIC

SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND GAMBLING IN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL

 

FEATURE / GARY SOUTER

 

Introduction

Professional footballers are increasingly vulnerable to stress and may develop addictive behaviours including a reliance on substances and/or a gambling addiction. Although in recent times a number of high profile professional footballers have shared their personal experiences of addiction publicly, there are undoubtedly many more who inevitably continue to suffer in silence. The demands within the professional game are huge and there is a relentless pressure on players to deliver performance. Footballers are constantly battling for their place in the team or for a new contract, which can create doubt and uncertainty. Regrettably, some players may resort to gambling or substance misuse as a way of coping with these overwhelming pressures.




2019

golf pic

THE ULTIMATE MIND GAME? 

FEATURE / DR ANDREW MURRAY

For those that have played golf, there is always a shot each time we play that allows us to puff out our chest, and feel like the game is easy. There will also be the missed putt or topped drive that can have us raging.




2019

Hidden in plain sight pic

HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT – MENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES IN FOOTBALL CLUBS

 

FEATURE / DR MISIA GERVIS, LARA BAKER & OSIMEIRO IMOEDEMHE

 

Recently, mental health and player wellbeing has been more openly discussed with an acknowledgement that clubs need to take responsibility for player welfare. Indeed, it has been well documented that footballers are at risk of experiencing a range of mental health problems1,2. Research has identified that up to 26%
of current and 42% of former footballers reported suffering from disordered eating and eating disorders3,4, and approximately 26% of current and 39% of former players have experienced anxiety and depression3,5. However, eating disorders can easily be missed and are difficult to diagnose within football, as their  distinguishing features are often too readily accepted as a normal part of an elite athletic lifestyle.




2019

MENTAL HEALTH SYMPTOMS IN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL PIC

MENTAL HEALTH SYMPTOMS IN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL 

FEATURE / VINCENT GOUTTEBARGE & GINO KERKHOFFS

In professional football, most of the epidemiological studies have been directed towards the physical health of players, principally towards the occurrence of musculoskeletal injuries and more recently their prevention. By contrast, scientific information about the prevalence of mental health symptoms among active or former professional footballers remains limited. This is surprising because (i) anecdotal reports of active or former professional footballers with mental health symptoms have been released in the media for many years, and
(ii) professional footballers are (cumulatively) exposed during and after their career to specific and non-specific stressors that might lead to mental health symptoms.




2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 13.13.21

THE ROLE OF A PSYCHOTHERAPIST IN A FOOTBALL LEAGUE CLUB

FEATURE / GARY BLOOM

Sports psychotherapist Gary Bloom works for a football league club. Here he explains what the benefits are of having a sports psychotherapist on the payroll.

A 13 year old boy sat opposite me – his head bowed in the small counselling room. His said.

“I’m gonna do it an’ all – I mean it – I’ve written the note to Mum saying goodbye and I’ve got the tablets – you won’t see me again after today.”

Before working in a football club I’ve worked as a psychotherapist embedded within state schools in the south of England. My job there was to work with under achieving pupils both behaviourally and academically.




2019

david cotterill pic

DAVID COTTERILL’S ROAD TO RECOVERY

MENTAL HEALTH

David Cotterill’s story is a tale of addiction, depression and ultimately, redemption. During this conversation with Dr Sean Carmody, he reflects on his new-found purpose as a champion for mental health for those within the sport, and beyond

David Cotterill is coming up to 6 months sober when we speak. After each month of sobriety he collects a chip to mark the achievement; “To Thine Own Self Be True” it reads. Sharing this with his thousands of followers on social media motivates him, but perhaps more importantly, it serves as inspiration for those who continue to suffer in silence.




2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.52.06

THE ROLE OF FOOTBALL CLUBS IN SUPPORTING COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH INITIATIVES 

FEATURE / DR ALAN PRINGLE

In recent years football clubs across the UK have begun to develop and deliver a range of programmes and projects aimed at mental health promotion and mental health interventions. Applying mental health interventions through football is effective as it can act as a “hook” to empower people to discuss mental health issues1. Components of the club infrastructure and identity, such as the ground or the badge can be important for engaging supporters, especially men2, and can help reduce the stigma attached to exploring mental health issues.

 




2019

INJURY MITIGATION PIC

INJURY MITIGATION IN TEAM SPORTS. PART-1: A REVIEW OF CURRENT DOGMA

FEATURE / COLIN W. FULLER – COLIN FULLER CONSULTANCY

Introduction

Professional sports are businesses; as such, they should adopt management practices that minimise risk levels and increase the prospect of long-term survival within the sport entertainment market. Businesses measure performance using a range of indicators1, such as production rates, product quality, customer satisfaction and return on investment: professional sports use similar indicators, such as win/loss ratios, promotion/relegation, spectator satisfaction and financial stability. Because performance indicators are invariably linked to injuries sustained within the working environment, injury mitigation is an important issue for all businesses.




2019

PRE SEASON WHEN FOUNDATIONS ARE LAID PIC

PRE-SEASON – WHEN FOUNDATIONS ARE LAID 

So you’ve coached, guided and nurtured your team through the season, with its vast catalogue of highs and lows. Perhaps you’ve won a title, captured domestic or international trophies, or clinched a hard-earned promotion to a higher division. Maybe you’ve masterminded recovery and survival from a seemingly hopeless position, and avoided relegation against all the odds. You’ve coped with myriad internal and external pressures, and come through the other side. Well-earned rest and recreation beckons – but the next campaign is already looming on the horizon… and preparations for the new season lie in wait around the corner.




2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.40.38

A POSITION SPECIFIC & POSITIONAL PLAY TRAINING IN ELITE FOOTBALL; CONTEXT MATTERS

FEATURE / PAUL S BRADLEY, ANDRES MARTIN-GARCIA, JACK D ADE & ANTONIO GOMEZ DIAZ

 

Introduction

Those who have watched elite football across the last decade, realise that the game is more demanding than ever1. This places more emphasis on training methods to prepare players for the rigors of the game2. If we use the mantra of ‘train like you play’ it might be wise to complement existing practices with conditioning drills related to a players’ tactical role3 (e.g. position specific) and even elements of the club’s playing style/ energetic profile4 (e.g. positional play). Thus, this piece will explore how such a stimulus can be incorporated into two areas of football conditioning: (1) team training and (2) individual end stage rehabilitation. Examples are presented from two European clubs.




2019

HOW TO THRIVE PIC

HOW TO THRIVE WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM YOUR FRIENDS 

WELLBEING /  Dr Caroline Marlow
 

Songs often tell us that a friend will get you through difficult times. True. In fact research often shows social support to be the most important thing that helps us buffer against and cope with many of life’s difficult situations. Now however, research also tells us that, in both difficult and normal times, social support is important in helping us pursue opportunities to develop and grow, and therefore to thrive.

2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.36.35

A BALANCING ACT; MAXIMISING PLAYER AVAILABILITY WHILST RESPECTING THE FUNDAMENTAL ETHICS OF HEALTHCARE IN SPORT

FEATURE / DR ROB TATHAM, SPORTS PHYSICIAN

 

Ethical and medico-legal considerations regarding healthcare provision in sport A sports clinician’s role may be summarised as “assisting athletes to achieve optimal performance, enhancing resilience to injury, and maximising availability for training and competition”. To achieve this a multi- disciplinary approach is required to address the many challenges that an athlete may face (Figure 1).

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2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.32.21

THE IMPORTANCE OF A UNIFORM CLUB PHILOSOPHY FOR ENHANCING HEALTH & PERFORMANCE 

FEATURE / ADAM BRETT & WILL ABBOTT
 

Professional football clubs are huge organisms, with numerous contributing parts. To achieve success it is vital the individual parts, for example the science and medical department, are aligned and working towards a common goal. Considering science and medical departments are comprised of physiotherapy, sport science, strength and conditioning, psychology and nutrition disciplines, this can equate to a large number staff. To increase collaboration between sub-disciplines, and avoid working within individual ‘silos’, a collective philosophy for the department must be formulated. A departmental philosophy, that each staff member and sub-discipline has contributed towards, allows for a collective vision and direction to be established.




2019

CAN MODERN FOOTBALL MATCH DEMANDS BE TRANSLATED INTO NOVEL TRAINING AND TESTING MODES? PIC

CAN MODERN FOOTBALL MATCH DEMANDS BE TRANSLATED INTO NOVEL TRAINING & TESTING MODES?

FEATURE / Paul S Bradley*, Michele Di Mascio, Magni Mohr, Dan Fransson, Carl Wells, Alexandre Moreira, Julen Castellano, Antonio Gomez Diaz & Jack D Ade

 

Association football is a complex sport with unpredictable activity patterns during matches1. Players regularly transition between short multi-directional high-intensity efforts and longer periods of low-intensity activity2. Time– motion analysis has been the data-collection technique of choice to quantify the physical match performance of elite footballers3. I




2019

THE FOOTBALL CREDITORS RULE PIC

THE “FOOTBALL CREDITORS RULE” – WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR YOU?

FEATURE / FMPA LAWYER MARTIN PRICE  
 

Unfortunately, the recent financial issues at Bolton and at Bury have brought the issue of insolvency within football clubs into sharp focus once more.

On the face of it a football club is no different to any other limited company and therefore an employee’s employment law rights should the club become insolvent are limited. These rights depend upon which legal form of insolvency the club enters into, the most common one being administration and less common but more terminal, liquidation.

2019

SPOTLIGHT ON SUBSTITUTES WHAT DO WE KNOW PIC

SPOTLIGHT ON SUBSTITUTES: WHAT DO WE KNOW?

 FEATURE / SAMUEL P. HILLS, STEVE BARRETT AND MARK RUSSELL

 

Substitutes in team sports have generated much media attention in recent years, with the head coach of England’s rugby union team, Eddie Jones, now referring to his replacements as ‘finishers, on account of their highly specialised role. Notwithstanding, the practices and responses of substitute players, particularly in football, remain poorly understood.




2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.19.59

ARE YOU SURVIVING OR THRIVING?

 FEATURE / L & M CONSULTING 

You do so much to help your team succeed, but by giving so much, do you actually give less? Looking after yourself is vital when supporting others, particularly when working in a demanding world such as football. Here we encourage you to honestly ask:

  • Am I healthy?
  • Am I thriving or just surviving?
  • Am I looking after myself as well as I should?



2019

Screenshot 2020-03-27 12.14.05

LIGHTFORCE® HELPING PEOPLE TO GOPERFORM  

 FEATURE / LIGHTFORCE LASER THERAPY

 

With over 20 years of experience at the highest level of professional sport, working in various roles with Watford, Reading and Norwich City among others, Luke Anthony broke away to establish GoPerform with a key aim in mind: to provide the services regularly on offer to top-level professional sportspeople to members of the general public.

2019

Translating strength into speed

TRANSLATING STRENGTH INTO SPEED 

FEATURE / MIKE MCGURN 

 

Rate Of Force Development

The rate of force development (RFD) is a measure of explosive strength, or simply how fast an athlete can develop force.

The definition of RFD is the speed in which the contractile elements of the muscle can develop force (1). Therefore, improving an athlete’s RFD may make them more explosive, as they can develop larger forces in a shorter period of time. Developing a more explosive athlete through strength and power developed in the gym and a combination of plyometrics, may improve their sporting performance.




2019

Life after football scott pearce pic

LIFE AFTER FOOTBALL

Feature / Scott Pearce  

 

So what do colleagues get up to in the first years after leaving the game?

Next in the series is former Sunderland AFC first team sports scientist Scott Pearce

What were the circumstances in which you left football?
I left Sunderland AFC in the summer of 2017 after 11 years due to the clubs restructuring process following relegation from the Premier League. Not only was I still smarting from the club’s relegation I was now out of work. Unfortunately, this is the reality of operating at the senior end of professional football
and my first experience of it. I was told many a time from experienced coaches to prepare for this but if I’m honest I never did.

2019

Sports pharmacist pic

SPORTS PHARMACIST: WHAT THE ROLE PROVIDES…

 FEATURE/ PAUL MOLONEY

 

The role of a Pharmacist in the multi-disciplinary sports medical team is one that is expanding and has plenty of potential to develop in modern day football.

Medicines optimisation differs from medicines management in a number of ways but most importantly it focuses on outcomes rather than process and systems.




2019

understanding the team behind the team pic

UNDERSTANDING THE TEAM BEHIND THE TEAM

 

Today’s football coaches have large medical teams to help keep their players in optimum physical condition… but what exactly do all those people do? UEFA Direct takes a closer look.

France’s victorious 2018 World Cup campaign did not stem solely from the brilliance of men like N’Golo Kanté, Paul Pogba and Antoine Griezmann. Nor, indeed, from the experience and tactical acumen of national coach Didier Deschamps. When you travel to a major tournament with a 20-strong backroom team, as happened with Les Bleus, there will inevitably be a long list of unsung heroes.

 




2019

The association between physical testing and training output pic

THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL TESTING & TRAINING OUTPUT ACROSS AN 8-WEEK TRAINING CYCLE AMONGST ELITE LEVEL SOCCER PLAYERS

 FEATURE/ ADAM L. OWEN, LEO DJAOUI, BRUNO MENDES, SHANE MALONE, OSMAN ATES

 

INTRODUCTION

Professional soccer players at the elite level are placed under continual domestic, European and international competitive demands. Inadequate conditioning levels combined with limited recovery phases between matches induce significant stress and subsequent injury risk (Carling et al., 2012; Laux et al., 2015). Technical and physical coaching staff involved within the physical preparation of players should understand both the demands required to compete at the elite level, in addition to the global physical profile of the player in order to balance physical capacity improvement and subsequent training loads. As such there is a requirement for effective player management and monitoring strategies across intensified training periods and competitive schedules (Dupont et al., 2010).




2019

Neurogenic hamstring and calf pain in football when is a tear not a tear? pic

NEUROGENIC HAMSTRING & CALF PAIN IN FOOTBALL WHEN IS A TEAR NOT A TEAR?

FEATURE / DR SIMON PETRIDES

 

Hamstring and calf injuries or strains are one of the most difficult conditions to treat in sports medicine. They are especially common in footballers but also found in the general population due to an increase in activity levels. The aetiology behind hamstring and calf injuries continues to be confusing and inconclusive for both medical practitioners and researchers. The fact that these injuries frequently reoccur suggests that ineffective management may be part of the problem. It is a common occurrence for football player to be removed from play with a suspected hamstring or calf tear with subsequent MRI and ultrasound studies proving inconclusive or showing no injury to the muscle.




2019

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GILMORE’S GROIN VISITED

 FEATURE/ SIMON MARSH AND RACHEL ROLPH

 

INTRODUCTION

With so many potential diagnoses, pathologies and treatment options, groin pain in athletes seems to get more and more complicated with every passing year! But, perhaps in our desire to understand groin pain in its entirety, we have lost site of the original, specific, clinical syndrome which has spawned so much discussion and generated so much confusion!




2019

NUTRITIONIST PIC MAG

NUTRITIONIST IN ACADEMY FOOTBALL: A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS?

FEATURE / MARK RUSSELL SCHOOL OF SOCIAL & HEALTH SCIENCES, LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY

 

To create a world leading Academy system that serves to provide more and better home grown players, the English Premier League initiated the Elite Player Performance Plan (EPPP) in 2012 [1,2]. This initiative sought to increase the coaching hours of English youth soccer players to better align to the amount delivered by European clubs and other British youth development programmes outside of football. Accordingly, when progressing from under 9 to under 21 age groups in the highest standards of classification, coaching hours rose from 3-12 to 4-16 h·player-1·week-1. Alongside such changes, the EPPP also introduced mandatory  requirements for ‘interdisciplinary specialists in the sports science and medicine team’ in various classifications of football Academy, including those associated with sports science, medical services, psychology, match analysis, physiotherapy etc. but not nutrition.




2019

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LIFE AFTER FOOTBALL

 FEATURE/ SIMON MALTBY

 

SO WHAT DO COLLEAGUES GET UP TO IN THE FIRST YEARS AFTER LEAVING THE GAME?

NEXT IN THE SERIES IS FORMER HULL CITY FC HEAD PHYSIOTHERAPIST SIMON MALTBY

When did you leave football and what did you do in the immediate term?

My last role in football finished in January 2017. I left Hull City in 2011 and then worked for 18 months with the national team of Bahrain followed by two seasons in the Indian Super League working with David James and Peter Taylor again.

2019

the temporal pattern of recovery in eccentric hamstring strength post-soccer specific fatigue pic

THE TEMPORAL PATTERN OF RECOVERY IN ECCENTRIC HAMSTRING STRENGTH POST-SOCCER SPECIFIC FATIGUE

FEATURE / DAVID RHODES, LARS MCNAUGHTON AND MATT GREIG

 

Eccentric hamstring strength is an etiological risk factor for soccer injury. The temporal pattern of recovery post-exercise is critical in injury management. 18 male professional soccer players completed baseline assessments of eccentric hamstring strength at isokinetic speeds of 60, 150 and 300°· s−1. Post SAFT90 measures were repeated immediately, + 24 hrs, + 48 hrs and + 72 hrs. Main effects for recovery time and testing speed in average torque (AvT), peak torque (PT) and the corresponding angle () were supplemented by regression modelling to describe the temporal pattern of recovery. A main effect for isokinetic testing speed was observed in PT and AvT. A main effect for recovery time highlighted greater strength pre-exercise, with a quadratic pattern to temporal recovery highlighting minima achieved at between 40–48 hrs. Strength parameters are not fully recovered until 96 hrs post soccer specific fatigue, with implications for training design and injury management, particularly within fixture- congested periods.




2019

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THE OFFICIATING TEAM MODERN CARE OF FOOTBALL REFEREES

 FEATURE/ CARLO CASTAGNA, ITALY AND MARIO BIZZINI

 

A football match cannot kick off without the referee and their assistants to regulate the behaviour of the players and enforce the rules of the game. The last official FIFA survey (‘Big Count 2006’) revealed that there were approximately 900,000 registered referees and assistant referees worldwide, across all levels of football. Of these, about 90% are male and 10% female. There are also about 3400 registered international referees wearing the FIFA badge.




2019

THE EFFECT OF SLEEP ON HIGH SPEED RUNNING

THE EFFECT OF SLEEP ON HIGH SPEED RUNNING DURING A WEEKLY MICRO-CYCLE IN ELITE FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS

FEATURE / WISEMAN, A. & STEBBINGS, G.K

 

The potential benefits of adequate sleep for increased recovery and performance in elite sport have been widely documented, however the effect of sleep on soccer match performance has been less reported, especially within female soccer. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sleep quality and quantity on match day high speed running (HSR) in elite female soccer players.




2019

FMPA webbox

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT: WHAT SHOULD YOU KNOW ABOUT R&D

The FMPA have launched an initiative to inform staff at all clubs in the Championship, Division 1 and 2 of the potential to undertake R & D within their departments.

While the thought of R & D might seem alien to many, the process of engaging and benefiting from this process can bring huge rewards to both the Clubs and the Medicine and Performance departments via a potential tax rebate available to your club for qualifying medical/rehab activities.

2018

Screenshot 2020-03-26 12.21.31

WATTBIKE POWERING PLAYERS FOR THE PITCH

ADVERTORIAL / WATTBIKE

 

The Wattbike makes athletes accountable to themselves, their coaches and their teammates. The consistency and reliability of the data means that there is no hiding behind the numbers, making it the perfect tool to ensure the best team is selected for each game. For managers and coaches, structuring their team’s pre-season training correctly, and making accurate comparisons between players, makes all the difference to their prospects for the season.

2018

The (return to play) times, they are a changin' pic

THE (RETURN TO PLAY) TIMES, THEY ARE A CHANGIN’

FEATURE/ MARKUS WALDÉN AND CLARE ARDERN, SWEDEN

FOUR EXAMPLES OF HOW DECISION-MAKING IS IMPROVING OUTCOMES FOR THE FOOTBALL PLAYER WITH ACL INJURY

There are just a few weeks remaining of the season’s football campaign. The match calendar is chock-a-block and your star player, with an expiring contract, tears his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Might this be a career-ending injury? Fast-forward a few months. The initial treatment and rehabilitation have progressed as well as can be expected and you have somehow managed to keep him engaged – despite the monotony – and the media off your back. So far, so good. Then things start to get interesting. There is constant speculation of a possible new contract and he will return to the pitch. Shortly after, he signs a contract extension and the manager takes an unexpected stand – no return to play until the medical team say that it is safe. A brief reprieve! However, there is still on-going media speculation that the player is expected to return soon. How do you tackle this?




2018

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LIFE AFTER FOOTBALL

EDITORIAL / ROB SWIRE 

 

SO WHAT DO COLLEAGUES GET UP TO IN THE FIRST YEARS AFTER LEAVING THE GAME?

WE `KICK OFF` THIS SERIES CATCHING UP WITH FORMER MANCHESTER UNITED PHYSIOTHERAPIST ROB SWIRE

In what circumstances did you leave football?

I had been working in football since 1990 (starting with Halifax Town FC in 1990 and at Manchester United since 1991), and as anyone working in football will know, the time involved is a huge commitment to make. After 24 years in the game I felt it was the right time to move to a gentler lifestyle.

2018

Lightforce helps keep wolves in the hunt pic

LIGHTFORCE® HELPS KEEP WOLVES IN THE HUNT

ADVERTORIAL/ LIGHTFORCE THERAPY LASER

 

 

Wolverhampton Wanderers achieved promotion to the Premier League with one of the lowest injury rates in the Championship last season. fcbusiness speaks to 1st team physiotherapist Oliver Leaper, about his use of laser treatment within the medical department.

How long have you been using your LightForce therapy laser and what ailments is it used to treat?

We introduced the system to our medical department in November 2017 and all of our therapists were trained in its use when we purchased it. It’s primarily used to treat acute and chronic musculoskeletal problems but we also use it for pre-training and on the rehabilitation of players that we have in the department.

2018

Vivomed webbox

THE SUPPLY OF MEDICINES TO SPORT TEAMS

ADVERTORIAL / Roni Lennon Bsc | Lead Pharmacist at Vivomed

 

Recent headlines in the media highlighting perceived deficiencies in record keeping regarding the supply of medicines in professional sport would suggest that it would be an appropriate time to review procedures around the supply of medicines in the Club environment.

2018

What do sports medicine professionals working in football need to know about sport psychology

WHAT DO SPORTS MEDICINE PROFESSIONALS WORKING IN FOOTBALL NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SPORT PSYCHOLOGY?

FEATURE/ DR CAROLINE HEANEY

 

 

Sport psychology and sports injury are undeniably linked – psychological factors have been shown to impact on both injury prevention and injury rehabilitation. Factors such as high stress levels can increase the risk of injury, whilst the occurrence of a sports injury can lead to several negative psychological reactions such as anger, frustration, fear, anxiety and depression which can impact on rehabilitation behaviour (e.g. adherence to a rehabilitation programme) and outcomes (e.g. recovery time) (Brewer & Redmond, 2017). Consequently, the use of sport psychology intervention during injury rehabilitation is advocated and has been shown to lead to several positive outcomes such as improved attitude, adherence and self-efficacy (Brewer, 2010).




2018

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ARE WE SQUEEZING THE LIFE OUT OF ADDUCTOR MONITORING

FEATURE/ GARY SILK

 

Hip and groin injuries are a common problem in Professional Football (1) due to the specific demands of match play and are typically difficult to both diagnose and manage. The most commonly injured being the Adductors, which have remained a constant burden over a 15 year period within elite level European football (2). Hip adductor strength is consistent throughout the literature as a strong risk factor for sustaining a new groin injury in football (3), while players with weak hip adductors have been found to have a 4 times higher risk of suffering a new groin injury compared to players without weak adductors (4). Consequently, athletic hip and groin research has received much attention over recent years, however specific injury prevention strategies for the adductors muscles are often overshadowed by the increasing number of hamstring injuries in football (5).




2018

Screenshot 2020-03-26 09.48.00

CARDIAC SCREENING SAVES FOOTBALLERS’ LIVES – BUT WE CAN DO MORE

FEATURE/ DAVID OXBOROUGH, READER IN CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY, LJMU

 

Sudden cardiac death in young football players is a worrying phenomenon, and, according to our latest study, it is also more common than previously thought.

For our study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, we evaluated more than 11,000 football players, aged 15- 17, over a 20-year period. The data revealed a prevalence of sudden cardiac death of seven in 100,000 players – higher than previous estimates of about two in every 100,000 players.




2018

FMPA webbox

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT R&D

The FMPA have launched an initiative to inform staff at all clubs in the Championship, Division 1 and 2 of the potential to undertake R & D within their departments.

While the thought of R & D might seem alien to many, the process of engaging and benefiting from this process can bring huge rewards to both the Clubs and the Medicine and Performance departments via a potential tax rebate available to your club for qualifying medical/rehab activities.

2018

Screenshot 2020-03-25 13.23.29

DAMIAN HUGHES

THE BARCELONA WAY

FEATURE/ DAMIAN HUGHES

 

Last year Manchester City seemed to be light years ahead of the Premier League pack. Can they emulate that success or even improve upon it this season? Professor Damian Hughes, an expert in winning cultures has spent the past three years studying coach Pep Guardiola’s methods.

Here he gives an assessment of the man considered by many to be the greatest coach for a generation.

In the decade since his largely unheralded appointment to the Nou Camp hotseat, Pep Guardiola has not only raised the bar in respect to football management, he has shifted the goalposts, taking the netting with him.




2018

The linsfranc pic

LISFRANC INJURIES IN WATERSPORTS

 

FEATURE/ NICK SAVVA, CONSULTANT ORTHOPAEDIC FOOT AND ANKLE SURGEON

The most common problems encountered when on the water are sunburn, dehydration, cuts and bruises. Virtually every possible musculoskeletal injury has been reported during kite and windsurfing but I am going
to focus on the lesser known, and potentially serious, Lisfranc injury. These are being recognised with increasing frequency in sports where the foot is attached to a board with a foot strap across the mid-foot.

 




2018

keeping your finger on the pulse pic

KEEPING YOUR FINGER ON THE PULSE!

FEATURE/ DR JIM MOXON – LIVERPOOL FC ACADEMY DOCTOR

 

SUMMARY

This case report details a case of a pseudoaneurysm of the dorsalis pedis in an academy player at Liverpool FC. These types of vascular malformation are very rare, with only 30 cases ever reported in the literature (Maydew, 2006).

HISTORY

A 15-year-old male academy footballer presented with a gradually evolving painless swelling over the dorsum
of his right foot, which had been developing for around 4 weeks. He recalled being stamped on by another player around 5 weeks ago, but he didn’t regard this as a significant injury at the time. In the intervening period between injury and our assessment he had been training and playing games with no obvious issues.




2018

The 5th asian indoor and martial arts games pic

THE 5TH ASIAN INDOOR & MARTIAL ARTS GAMES: ASHGABAT, TURKMENISTAN (2017). FMPA MEMBERS’ EXPERIENCES OF WORKING AS PART OF THE EVENT MEDICAL TEAM.

 

FEATURE/ RICHARD EVANS, KEVIN PETERSEN & ALAN RANKIN

The 5th Asian and Martial Arts Games (AIMAG) were held in September 2017 – Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. The event boasted 21 different sports and 6,000 athletes from the Oceania, Asia and Middle East region. In addition, it had three FMA members present! The FMA met up with them to discuss the event.

2018

Musculoskeletal ultrasound pic

MUSCULOSKELETAL ULTRASOUND: A SUMMARY OF ITS USES, LIMITATIONS & TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

FEATURE/ STUART WILDMAN, BSC (HONS) MSC, PG CERT, PG DIP

 

The use of diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound is rapidly expanding, driven by increased awareness amongst medical and allied health professionals, improving technology and reducing ultrasound system costs. This article aims to provide you with a brief and hopefully informative summary of some of its uses, limitations and an insight into training opportunities.




2018

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NORDIC HAMSTRING EXERCISE – HOW CAN WE MAKE IT WORK IN THE ELITE FOOTBALL ENVIRONMENT?

 

FEATURE/ ADAM JOHNSON

We all know that the hamstrings are the most commonly occurring injury in elite football, with each twenty-five man squad suffering from an average of seven injuries per season (1). We also know that the problem is only getting worse with a 4% annual increase in training-related hamstring injuries (2) being reported over a thirteen year period. So why if we are seeing so many of these injuries and there is such a wealth of literature being published, are we seemingly struggling to prevent them from occurring? The answer to this question is obviously multi-faceted, but this article will look at the role that the Nordic Hamstring Exercise could play, and how it could be implemented within an elite football environment.




2018

Why long term injury to players is a mental health problem pic

WHY LONG-TERM INJURY TO PLAYERS IS A MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEM

FEATURE/ Dr Misia Gervis

Long-term injury often poses a threat to a player’s mental health, as it is often the time of greatest psychological struggle. Watching from the side lines of the physio room, players can experience a whole range of psychological difficulties. However, the tried and tested method to support long-term injured players is through physiotherapy and physical rehabilitation. Rarely is an injury thought of as being both physically and psychologically traumatic and treated accordingly.




2018

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GREAT TOE PLANTAR: TOE INJURY

 

FEATURE/ Mr Iona Tuder Jones 

Plantar plate injuries of the great toe are thankfully not that commonly seen in football. They are much more common in rugby or American football. It is however important to be aware of how they happen, and how best to manage them. Missed injuries can be career threatening. As always an understanding of the anatomy simplifies the process.




2018

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HAND INJURIES IN GOALKEEPERS

FEATURE/SAM HAINES AND RAJ BHATIA 

Football is one of the most popular world sports, with FIFA estimating there to be around 270 million active players(1). Injuries therefore are extremely commonplace, with evidence to show injury incidence is around 8 injuries/1000 hours(2). Owing to the feet being the most utilized body part in the sport, lower extremity injuries are common and count for around 80% of total injuries within football(2). As a result, most of the literature focuses on preventative measures in such injuries(3).




2018

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‘CONTEXT IS KING’ WHEN INTERPRETING MATCH PHYSICAL PERFORMANCES

 

FEATURE/ PAUL S BRADLEY, MARK EVANS, ANDY LAWS & JACK D ADE 

‘I was blind, now I can see’. Thus, is it time to retire the ‘blind’ distance covered model that’s been used in football for decades and replace it with an integrated model that contextualises physical efforts during matches




2018

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THE EFFECT OF THREE DIFFERENT (-135°C) WHOLE BODY CRYOTHERAPY EXPOSURE DURATIONS ON ELITE RUGBY LEAGUE PLAYERS

FEATURE/JILL ALEXANDER

The aim of the study was to explore whether the length of whole body cryotherapy (WBC) exposures affect changes in inflammatory blood markers, tissue oxygenation, core and skin surface temperature alongside thermal comfort and sensation. The application of extreme cold air for short periods known as WBC presents anecdotal evidence for its use in elite sport, with minimal evidence to identify optimal exposure protocols.




2018

Dont waste your time pic

DON’T WASTE YOUR TIME TAKING ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTS AFTER EXERCISE

 

FEATURE/ MAYUR RANCHORDAS

The antioxidant market is big business and millions of pounds are spent every year on antioxidant supplements – such as vitamin A, C and E – as well as fruit and vegetable extracts and juices.

Antioxidants are so popular – particularly among people who do a lot of exercise – because it is believed they help to reduce muscle soreness after exercise. It is thought that by taking antioxidant supplements in doses much higher than the recommended amounts, muscles recover quicker by reducing some of the harmful effects of exercise. And this is why so many people swear by antioxidants – such as cherry juice or pomegranate juice – after a workout.




2018

Why screening mental health pic

WHY SCREENING ‘MENTAL HEALTH’ MIGHT BE THE MISSING LINK IN REDUCING INJURY

FEATURE/ANDY BARKER 

The prevalence of mental health issues is increasing within modern day sport. The most common are depression and anxiety, but poor mental health can manifest itself in many ways.

From the outset high profile sportsmen and women seem to have it all. For most, they are playing a sport they love, being paid handsomely for doing so and thus, can lead a lavish lifestyle. But, that doesn’t mean they are immune to mental health issues. Quite the opposite in many respects. The pressure to perform consistently at the highest level, dealing with injuries, contractual issues and off-field stressors are just a few examples that can result in players struggling psychologically.




2018

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GRASS TO GAME

FEATURE/ SCOTT PEARCE

The role of a sports scientist in the end stages of long term rehabilitation of an injured player.

In winter’s edition I discussed the role of the sports scientist in the mid stages of rehab with the focus on progressing the player from the gym to the grass whilst developing workload tolerance and robustness. It is widely accepted that the further the player progresses through rehabilitation the more of a direct and significant influence the sports scientist plays. In this edition I would like to discuss my personal experiences of end stage rehabilitation. At this stage the player will now engage in linear based running activities on the grass following exposure to the Anti-gravity treadmill. As a consistent message throughout my articles I again emphasise the importance of the support team (medical/coaching) to monitor the players development and responses to any unaccustomed workload.

 




2018

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WOMEN’S FOOTBALL & THE

MENSTRUAL CYCLE… HOW WE

CAN FURTHER INDIVIDUALISE?

FEATURE/ANDREW WISEMAN & GEORGIE BRUINVELS

Female athletes are two to eight times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) than men when using the same rules and equipment.

Crucially however, risk is enhanced further at certain times in the menstrual cycle in line with the changes in ovarian hormones. Specific injury prevention programmes incorporating individualised neuromuscular training are already being implemented to support female athletes, however it is now important to consider incorporating menstrual cycle tracking to enhance awareness and mitigate risk.

 




2018

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FOOTBALL REHABILITATION:

HOW TO SAFELY REINTEGRATE, AVOID RE-INJURY AND PREPARE PLAYERS FOR THE DEMANDS OF THE PREMIER LEAGUE

 

FEATURE/ANDREW WISEMAN & GEORGIE BRUINVELS

 

Injuries in professional football are commonplace and whilst numerous strategies that are supported by science are put in place to prevent injuries from occurring many practitioners suggest that injuries are unavoidable.

In a well structured and balanced training programme however almost every injury is avoidable and when an injury does occur, more

often than not whenever you look back along the timeline leading to an injury there is a glitch or an oversight in the planning, prevention, conditioning, or regeneration process particularly on an individual level.




2018

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DOES THE STIGMA ATTACHED
TO MENTAL HEALTH RESTRICT PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLERS SEEKING PROFESSIONAL HELP WHILST STILL ACTIVELY PLAYING?

 

DISSERTATION/ JORDAN LUKE BROADBENT

Football is the world’s most popular team sport and there are over 265 million people who actively play the sport. It is estimated that there are 110,000 professional male footballers worldwide and over 26,000 in the UK specifically1,2. Professional football has a high injury rate and 17% of all injuries involve the knee3.

Apart from significant acute injury, the cumulative effect of repetitive micro-trauma and joint overloading could also prove detrimental to the knee joint, as is recognised in other physically demanding occupations such as coal mining4. A significant knee injury is a key risk factor of long-term conditions such as knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Indeed, in 2005, the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council (IIAC) considered whether KOA was an industrial disease for professional football5. The results of the enquiry found that the evidence was lacking for the following reasons: varying definitions and study methodologies employed to answer the research; most studies were small, four had no control groups and there was a lack of adjustment for the full spectrum of known risk factors for KOA, most especially significant knee injury2 6-11.




2018

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WAIT, DON’T TELL ME: FACILITATING ORGANIC KNOWLEDGE GENERATION WITHIN PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL

FEATURE/NEIL GIBSON, GRAEME JONES & ROBERT McCUNN

Sports medicine and sport science departments have grown exponentially in recent years; we don’t have to go back too long, and programmes such as the Premiership years are a stark reminder of this, to see only a handful of people occupying the touchline.

Modern day stadiums, however, must provide not only a ‘bench’ but usually a secondary bench as well, such are the number of staff who travel with teams to service their sports medicine and science needs. Whilst the proliferation of new roles is no doubt a good thing for the industry, it does present organisational issues for clubs and heads of department; these include how best to manage the process of internal and external knowledge transfer as well as providing adequate
and appropriate staff development opportunities.




2018

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THE PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN EX PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLERS COMPARED TO GENERAL POPULATION CONTROLS

FEATURE/DR GWEN FERNANDES

Football is the world’s most popular team sport and there are over 265 million people who actively play the sport. It is estimated that there are 110,000 professional male footballers worldwide and over 26,000 in the UK specifically1,2. Professional football has a high injury rate and 17% of all injuries involve the knee3.

Apart from significant acute injury, the cumulative effect of repetitive micro-trauma and joint overloading could also prove detrimental to the knee joint, as is recognised in other physically demanding occupations such as coal mining4. A significant knee injury is a key risk factor of long-term conditions such as knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Indeed, in 2005, the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council (IIAC) considered whether KOA was an industrial disease for professional football5. The results of the enquiry found that the evidence was lacking for the following reasons: varying definitions and study methodologies employed to answer the research; most studies were small, four had no control groups and there was a lack of adjustment for the full spectrum of known risk factors for KOA, most especially significant knee injury2 6-11.




2018

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A CRITICAL REVIEW OF THE GENDER DIFFERENCES IN MALE AND FEMALE NON-CONTACT ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RISK FACTORS AND PREVENTION IN SOCCER

 

FEATURE/ANDREW WISEMAN

Even though female soccer is one of the fastest growing sports in the world, the literature within female soccer is limited (Andersson et al., 2010; Di Salvo et al., 2007; Krustrup et al., 2005; Mohr et al., 2008), while the mechanisms and risk factors for non-contact ACL injuries have mainly been studied in female soccer players (Alentorn-Geli et al., 2009).

In comparison with the female player, the male soccer player possesses greater relative strength, power, speed and match specific components than their female counterparts (Turner et al., 2013).
In turn, female soccer players are at a greater risk by up to six times of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury compared to their male counterparts (Arendt and Dick, 1995) thus, female players continue to sustain ACL injuries at higher rates than men in the comparable sports of soccer, basketball, and lacrosse (Agel et al., 2016).




2018

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SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE PROVISIONS IN THE FIFTH TIER

 

FEATURE/MIKE HINE, HEAD OF SPORTS SCIENCE & MEDICINE, LINCOLN CITY FC

We’ve all seen the wonderful provisions that the elite clubs’ sports science and medical staff have, via the internet and coverage on TV. Great, thousands of pounds spent on the most hi-tech equipment, number of backroom staff superseding the playing squad, unlimited resources but what are things like at the base of the football pyramid? Let me tell you, Sports Science and Medicine does actually exist down here too!

I walked in the door at the Sincil Bank Stadium, home to Lincoln City FC in June 2016 to find what could only been seen as blank canvas, a project in the making. The job title read ‘Head of Sports Science and Medicine’… “Where’s the sports science and medicine equipment?” I asked myself. The club had just appointed its first ever sports scientist; Luke Jelly, together we were tasked to develop a provision that would support the club’s on-field ambitions and goals. How do we do such a thing with little money and no pre-existing provision or equipment?




2018

Scott Pearce

GYM TO GRASS

FEATURE/SCOTT PEARCE

The role of a sports scientist in the mid stages of long term rehabilitation of an injured player.

In autumn’s edition I discussed the role of the sports scientist in the early stages of rehab and how a sports scientist can play a fundamental role in the rehabilitation process even at the onset of injury by showing emotional support, working with the physio’s/doctors and working around the injury to reduce the effects of detraining and maintain a level of physical condition. In this edition I would now like to discuss my experiences of a sports scientist role during the mid-stage of long term rehab.




2018

andy renshaw pic

ACADEMY v FIRST TEAM:

WHICH PATH TO CHOOSE?

 

FEATURE/ANDY RENSHAW

I have been fortunate enough to experience over 15 years in full-time football within The Premier League, and count myself even more fortunate to have had extensive experience of working in both Academy and First Team environments.

After completing a BSc (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Science in Sheffield, and some voluntary work experience at Sheffield United, I enrolled onto a part-time BSc (Hons) degree in Physiotherapy and started working voluntary at Manchester RUFC, who were then in rugby’s version of the Championship. A friend of mine was the physio there and I spent a season observing and assisting physiotherapy provision and in-turn assisted with rehab/ prevention programmes for the squad – again voluntary, unpaid work. I’d spent my time prior to (and during) university working in gyms to help pay my way through university, I did as many courses as I could squeeze in and spent every Saturday/ Sunday back in Manchester training both the general population and semi- professional athletes during this seven year spell.